SOME STATS ON MY ‘THE FOUNDER’ REVIEW – OVER 1,000 VIEWS FOR THE MONTH OF APRIL 2017

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I apologise for this ‘tooting of trumpet’post and also for said trumpet not being as impressive as some of my fellow blogs saxophones, clarinets and French horns. Stats though have for a long time been fascinating to me so I thought I would share this never to be repeated occurrence.

I published five reviews in 1 day back in January to effectively catch up on films I’d seen in the past year. The day was January 18, 2017 and concluded with a post about The Founder titled Ray Kroc…What An Asshole! It proved the most popular of those five reviews and closed out the month less than a fortnight later with 53 views averaging 3 views a day with the majority coming in the first 48 hours. So far, so normal for this blog. Some posts retain interest over the months. Last year reviews for Eye in the Sky, Hunt for the Wilderpeople, Star Trek: Beyond kept getting interest months after being published with a few views sprinkled here and there. So it was no surprise when some love came the way of Ray Kroc Asshole in February. Yet it quickly became apparent something else was afoot and due to fellow blogger Beetley Pete’s own experiences and knowledge it was ascertained that the review was being featured on some app which greatly increased it’s profile. There were also a lot of people coming out of The Founder and google searching Ray Kroc Asshole and variations on that. Also as Beetley Pete pointed out as the post became my most seen it started to feature on references to my site through various means. The more popular a post becomes the more it defaults to coming up in searches and references. It’s not in my humble opinion one of my best or worst reviews. It is relatively short though and I think reflects a broad consensus on the film which is that it is well made with a particularly great Michael Keaton performance but that it is hard to enjoy due to Kroc being such a…well you know.

In February there were 372 views with an average per day of 13 views for that month.

In March there were 212 views with an average per day of 6 views for that month.

Fair to say as April began the views were slowing down but with 637 views there was a good chance one day we might reach 1,000. Then the views shot up following digital and disc release of the title across the world. April 19 I posted happily that the milestone of 1,000 views had been reached, quite a lucky break for my little corner of the internet.

Yet the views while slowing down again now kept coming for the rest of the month and I just to share some of these stats. In April Ray Kroc….What An Asshole received 1,098 views with an average of 36 views per day. On the 23rd of April it received 135 views which only a handful of other posts on this blog have received in their lifetime. Captain Reg Saunders of the Australian Army has received 141 views mostly due to it kindly being featured on GP Cox’s site. 124 views for The Heroes of Kibeho have been received and that is a reflection of how painful, moving and important the story of those Australian soldiers is. While my review of the ever popular Hunt for the Wilderpeople has received 123 views. 115 views have been received for a post about South Vienamese General Ngo Quang Truong whose story can only be heard more. My Sunshine Blogger Award post has not retained interest but still has 107 views all up. 99 views have been received for a review of my favourite film from last year Eye in the Sky.  For that week there were 414 views, more than the crazy amount of views in February 2017.

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In fact with this crazy amount of views that stats for the blog are out of whack. There were 1,712 views in America for 2016, for just this past month there have been 1,077 views from the United States of America. 2017 with 5,495 views and 3,277 visitors now has almost as many as the whole year of 2016 with 5,673 views and 3,206 visitors and it’s not really because the blog has grown in popularity but just because this post has featured on an app and is now in the google search matrix.

Again this isn’t really a reflection on what I’ve done but more on the skill of IT gurus and the makers of The Founder who at the very least created a strong reaction from the audience to the central character.

An interesting tidbit, the most popular blog post from April was Over 1,000 Views For The Founder with 56 views. Either way, fluke or not, I’m very grateful for it and I hope those people who came across the post enjoyed reading it.

-Lloyd Marken

HUNT FOR THE WILDERPEOPLE   hunt for the wilderpeople

 

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CAPTAIN REG SAUNDERS OF THE AUSTRALIAN ARMY

Two decades before he was recognised as a citizen of his country he fought for it in two wars. He couldn’t vote in his own country where his people had been for thousands of years. This was nothing new. His father Walter (Chris) Saunders and uncle William Reginald Rawlings MM had done so before him in the Great War, the uncle not returning home. His family would continue to pay a cost for serving the nation. His brother Harry Saunders would die at Kokoda and his first marriage would not withstand his time away in Korea. What did change was that he became the first Aboriginal to be commissioned into the Australian Army going on to command 100 men in combat.

He was born in Victoria of the Gunditjmara people and worked in a sawmill from a young age. In 1940 he joined the Australian Imperial Force immediately displaying natural leadership skill, in 6 weeks he was promoted to Lance Corporal and within 3 months he had made Sergeant. He was posted to the 2/7th Battalion after training where his rank reverted to Private and he went to Benghazi and then the island of Crete. The 2/7th took part in the fighting around Canae and temporarily checked the German advance with a bayonet charge on 42nd street. As the Allies evacuated, Saunders’ unit fought rearguard actions and were left behind. Most were taken prisoner, a few hid out in the hills and caves of the islands relying on help from the locals. Saunders was one who evaded capture for 12 months and managed to escape rejoining the 2/7th.

He next fought in the Salamaua-Lae campaing where as a platoon sergeant he took command of the platoon when the platoon commander was wounded. Subsequently his commanding officer recommended that he receive a commission. This caused the Army some trepidation given “its special significance” but Saunders  completed sixteen weeks of training back in Australia and received his commission. During training he shared a tent with Victoria Cross winner Tom Derrick.

He returned to New Guinea and was a platoon commander during the Aitape-Wewak campaign with the 2/7th serving until the end of the war. He was hospitalised for 3 weeks after being wounded by Japanese gunfire at Maprik.

Rejected for service with the British Commonwealth Occupation Force (BCOF) in Japan, he was a shipping clerk and builder’s labourer following the war. With the outbreak of hostilities in Korea he rejoined the Army and was allocated to 3RAR rising to the lofty heights of Captain. He commanded C Company during the Battle of Kapyong April 22nd to April 25 (ANZAC Day) 1951. At Kapyong, a Brigade of United Nations Force stalled the advance of a whole Chinese division pivotally avoiding a breakthrough on the UN’s Command Central Front. 3RAR was subsequently awarded a US Presidential Unit Citation for their actions.

He oversaw training for national servicemen after returning from Korea but he left the Army in 1954 going to work first in the logging industry and then for the next decade in the Austral Bronze company. Saunders also became involved in the Returned and Services League. In 1967 be became an Aboriginal Liaison Officer in the Office of Aboriginal Affairs. In the Queen’s Birthday Honours of June 1971 his community work was recognised when he was appointed Member of the Order of the British Empire (Civil Division). He passed away in 1990 leaving behind 8 of his 10 children. Two had sadly predeceased him.

He was the first Aboriginal serviceman to command a Rifle Company, and was respected and popular with his men. His biographer and friend, Harry Gordon, an Australian journalist in Korea, wrote of him “He was accepted unreservedly by the men who served with him because false values do not flourish among front-line soldiers.”

-Lloyd Marken